Facebook and Google are racing neck to neck in a multi-billion dollar battle to shape the future. Both the tech companies are spending an awful lot of money on emerging technologies. Their aims: when their current businesses are disrupted which will eventually happen; they’ll have a contingency plan.

As Facebook is doing fine now, it knows that its core business could be threatened just as it happened for MySpace. This is seen as a potential reason for why Facebook has poured billions of dollars into a photo sharing network, facial recognition software, a chat app and now virtual reality company Oculus.

Google, on the other hand, has invested billions in wearable gadgets, military robots, and driverless cars and most recently through its purchase of Nest connected home devices like smoke detectors and thermostats. It almost seems like Facebook and Google are now quite worthy opponents for each other in the all new Silicon Valley’s version of a Cold War arms race.

Facebook and Google are high technology giants engaged in a real world game of ‘Monopoly’ to grab the choicest technology chattels in a bid to maintain and extend their supremacy with each other as well and various other rivals.

But in the emerging Cold War between Facebook and Google, Facebook can’t take quite as many risks. Google has $59 billion in cash and can lose a bet every once in a while, as it did with Motorola Mobility. (Google bought Motorola for $12.5 billion in 2011 but subsequently shed most of the assets, including the recent sale of Motorola’s smartphone business to Lenovo for about $3 billion.)

Numerous firms that were once industry titans fell to Earth after they failed to adapt to a new wave of technology. In fact, both companies literally have their headquarters in the graveyard of former tech darlings.

Facebook’s Menlo Park offices are in the former home of Sun Microsystems, which Oracle snapped up in 2010. And Google lives in the former headquarters of Silicon Graphics Inc. — the once-mighty computing company that filed for bankruptcy in 2009.

But we need to give both companies some credit for knowing they can’t rest on their laurels. Google CEO Larry Page and Facebook’s Zuckerberg seem to recognize that it’s not easy to stay on top of the tech world forever.

Category
Tags
Schema
<!-- JSON-LD markup generated by Google Structured Data Markup Helper. --> <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context" : "http://schema.org", "@type" : "Article", "name" : "Facebook and Google in Tech cold war", "author" : { "@type" : "Person", "name" : "sgs" }, "image" : "https://www.sgstechnologies.net/sites/default/files/2020-01/google_fb.png", "articleSection" : "Facebook and Google are racing neck to neck in a multi-billion dollar battle to shape the future. Both the tech companies are spending an awful lot of money on emerging technologies. Their aims: when their current businesses are disrupted which will eventually happen; they�ll have a contingency plan", "articleBody" : "As Facebook is doing fine now, it knows that its core business could be threatened just as it happened for MySpace. This is seen as a potential reason for why Facebook has poured billions of dollars into a photo sharing network, facial recognition software, a chat app and now virtual reality company Oculus.</P>\n\n<P>Google, on the other hand, has invested billions in wearable gadgets, military robots, and driverless cars and most recently through its purchase of Nest connected home devices like smoke detectors and thermostats. It almost seems like Facebook and Google are now quite worthy opponents for each other in the all new Silicon Valley�s version of a Cold War arms race.</P>\n\n<P>Facebook and Google are high technology giants engaged in a real world game of �Monopoly� to grab the choicest technology chattels in a bid to maintain and extend their supremacy with each other as well and various other rivals.</P>\n\n<P>But in the emerging Cold War between Facebook and Google, Facebook can�t take quite as many risks. Google has $59 billion in cash and can lose a bet every once in a while, as it did with Motorola Mobility. (Google bought Motorola for $12.5 billion in 2011 but subsequently shed most of the assets, including the recent sale of Motorola�s smartphone business to Lenovo for about $3 billion.)</P>\n\n<P>Numerous firms that were once industry titans fell to Earth after they failed to adapt to a new wave of technology. In fact, both companies literally have their headquarters in the graveyard of former tech darlings.</P>\n\n<P>Facebook�s Menlo Park offices are in the former home of Sun Microsystems, which Oracle snapped up in 2010. And Google lives in the former headquarters of Silicon Graphics Inc. �¢â�¬â�� the once-mighty computing company that filed for bankruptcy in 2009.</P>\n\n<P>But we need to give both companies some credit for knowing they can�t rest on their laurels. Google CEO Larry Page and Facebook�s Zuckerberg seem to recognize that it�s not easy to stay on top of the tech world forever.", "url" : "https://www.sgstechnologies.net/blog/facebook-and-google-tech-cold-war", "publisher" : { "@type" : "Organization", "name" : "SGS" } } </script>

Facebook and Google in Tech cold war

 93

Facebook and Google are racing neck to neck in a multi-billion dollar battle to shape the future. Both the tech companies are spending an awful lot of money on emerging technologies. Their aims: when their current businesses are disrupted which will eventually happen; they’ll have a contingency plan.

As Facebook is doing fine now, it knows that its core business could be threatened just as it happened for MySpace. This is seen as a potential reason for why Facebook has poured billions of dollars into a photo sharing network, facial recognition software, a chat app and now virtual reality company Oculus.

Google, on the other hand, has invested billions in wearable gadgets, military robots, and driverless cars and most recently through its purchase of Nest connected home devices like smoke detectors and thermostats. It almost seems like Facebook and Google are now quite worthy opponents for each other in the all new Silicon Valley’s version of a Cold War arms race.

Facebook and Google are high technology giants engaged in a real world game of ‘Monopoly’ to grab the choicest technology chattels in a bid to maintain and extend their supremacy with each other as well and various other rivals.

But in the emerging Cold War between Facebook and Google, Facebook can’t take quite as many risks. Google has $59 billion in cash and can lose a bet every once in a while, as it did with Motorola Mobility. (Google bought Motorola for $12.5 billion in 2011 but subsequently shed most of the assets, including the recent sale of Motorola’s smartphone business to Lenovo for about $3 billion.)

Numerous firms that were once industry titans fell to Earth after they failed to adapt to a new wave of technology. In fact, both companies literally have their headquarters in the graveyard of former tech darlings.

Facebook’s Menlo Park offices are in the former home of Sun Microsystems, which Oracle snapped up in 2010. And Google lives in the former headquarters of Silicon Graphics Inc. ââ?¬â? the once-mighty computing company that filed for bankruptcy in 2009.

But we need to give both companies some credit for knowing they can’t rest on their laurels. Google CEO Larry Page and Facebook’s Zuckerberg seem to recognize that it’s not easy to stay on top of the tech world forever.

Category : Branding

Let's build SOMETHING GREAT TOGETHER!